Monthly Archives: November 2012

A Peruvian in Australia: One Year Abroad.

On September 22nd it was a year since that eventful arrival of mine to the land of sun and kangaroos. One year! I could hardly believe the time had gone so fast! Yet again, when I looked back and I saw all that I have accomplished it would actually seem longer than a year. That, by the way, makes me happy. To know that my time here has so far been put to good use.

So, how can I start explaining how I feel after a year in Oz? Mel was asking me the other day what were the things I like about Melbourne. I normally tell the things I don´t like. I’m a bit critical like that. It’s a sign of my personality. I don’t do it to be mean. I fear if I’m not I’d become used to things and take them for granted. I’m more worried about not criticising enough than about being critical.

Which brings me to my subject: things I like and things I don’t like about living in Melbourne.  So, let´s get on with the bad news first. Have I complained enough about the public transport system?  I don´t think I could possibly have. But yeah, it is publicly known that Melbourne has unreliable public transport. The trams and buses work alright as far as I have seen. The trains is what sort of bothered me at first. I have to say, they seem to have improved in the last couple of months (or I have gotten more used to it).

You see, in Peru the problem for me was that public transport was ‘too reliable’, meaning there was an extra offer of buses and taxis, producing chaos and speeding. But when one is in a hurry no one complains. Here, things are much more civilised. And sometimes TOO civilised. At first that transition wasn’t easy. But patience is a muscle and mine has grown and extended.

Wanna drive in Lima? Go for it…

I do love that in Melbourne people are good drivers and respect the other drivers and the rules. People are polite and patient generally speaking. Of course, taxi drivers are and will be taxi drivers anywhere in the world. If you have been to Peru you will understand what I am talking about. Driving is insane there! Always defensively, noisy, and unsafe. I am driving a little every week around my suburb now that I have a License and I feel really safe.

One thing I miss from Peru is the human contact, the Latin spark. A few days ago an older fella was making conversation with me on the train. He first tried the guy next to him but the young fella didn’t even bother answering. With the woman across seating in front he didn’t even try. I chatted with him for a couple minutes before he left. He quickly commented that ‘nobody ever talks on the trains these days’ and I couldn’t help but agree. I look at the trains and all I see is people looking at their phones, plugged in earphones of different calibers, newspaper, book, waving their eyes aimlessly trying to avoid contact with another pair of eyes. All of which is fine, I do it myself. But I do get the feeling people on the train (particularly on the train) are extremely against the idea of simply talking to a stranger. I get that this is a sign of ‘everyone minds its own bussiness’ but it seems to me that it breaks a little with the whole idea of community. But I understand that there’s just too many of us like to say ‘good morning’ when you walk aboard the traincar.

You probably won’t meet the love of your life on a train, but a little chat to a stranger doesn’t hurt.

People are busy in modern life. And modern city life is even busier. A little bit of sympathy from a stranger couldn’t hurt though. But the way things are these days, if I went around just making conversation I have the feeling I would be tagged as a weirdo or an offender of some sort.

In this respect I have usually found myself closer to the people of country-side Victoria than to the people of the city. The man from the train was from the country. People in the city can be ‘too cool’ and sometimes they seem really snobby. Even the homeless people are a bit snobby sometimes. The other day one of them wouldn’t receive food saying ‘not another muffin, thanx!’ A Peruvian homeless person would love to have such luck. Still I wouldn’t dare to generalise people in this city. I guess those are some of the symptoms of a country doing well economically. But there are doubts and fears rising as to for how much longer the economy will keep up the good mood. Will people still be indifferent when hard times come?

I’m not saying in Peru everyone talks to everyone. There are people glued to their smart-phones and earphones just as well. That’s global stuff. But it seems somewhat more ‘friendly’. I wonder if I am being biased and I am romancing my country in my memories. I know that happens when one leaves home. Maybe I need to go back and see it again with my new ‘foreign’ eyes. I do have plans to go back in 2013. Then I will be able to tell for sure.

All of this doesn’t mean that Aussies aren’t friendly. They are and very. They also respect very much other people’s business. That’s part of the Melbourne spirit, they are proud of being relaxed. For a city I guess they are, though other Australians claim their parts of the country are more chilled, like Perth or Brisbane.

Wangetti Beach, near Cairns. That’s my kind of weather. Photo: Andrew Watson.

Nevertheless, I can see myself living here for some time. Both Mel and I want more country-side and warmer weather though. A little more on the jungle like side of things: exuberant vegetation, lots of Vitamin D and tropical fruits. We really liked Cairns and Brisbane. The weather is one of Melbourne’s infamous features. If it was just a bit more predictable and less all seasons in one day.

The food is been a great experience in Melbourne. From our first date at Maha to our last outing at Chin Chin. From fancy places that cook fusion food to popular spots that prepare traditional Asian cuisine.  I’ve found Peruvian dishes at Nobu and tasted Thai food for the first time here. Greek is also popular and Mel loves it. Public BBQ’s are everywhere and during summer it’s common to walk around the parks and smell a grill cooking. While here I’ve re-valued sushi and got to like it after thinking that all there was to it was raw fish. Pizza is good because of the number of Italians that have settled in Melbourne. We often get it from Fabio’s. And when I miss Peruvian food too much, there are the things that my mum sends on the post to make my day. So really, I can’t complain in that department.

Melbourne’s alleys and cool cafes and restaurants are abundant.

I also like the people are big sports fans here. So much so that it can be annoying. I don’t think I can get used to the office people running around Melbourne’s CBD during lunchtime. One of these days I’m gonna trip into one of them casually. On the other hand, it’s nice that the city has so many bike paths, running lanes, exercise grounds on parks, public pools, etc. Personally I’ve started doing a lot more sports than I used to. Not just chin-ups and biking here and there but going out for a run once or twice a week makes me feel quite healthy.

Sports Precinct: Rod Laver Arena, AAMI Park and the Yarra River on the side.

All in all Melbourne is a cool city. The availability of culture, the fashion (though I’m tired of seeing every possible combination of Ugg boots (furry boots) with tight pants on the streets. THAT IS WRONG!), the bar scene, the music shows. There’s a little bit of everything and a little for everyone. People from all over the world in an ordered place. Sometimes too expensive but a nice place indeed. I can see why they named it the Most Liveable City in The World for 2 years in a row. Melbourne is beautiful and I still have much to discover. Plans for the future are go and see a game of the Australian Open of tennis, go to the MCG (the largest stadium in Australia) to watch the cricket, go to the horse races during Melbourne Cup…

Now summer is coming and cool things like cinema in the open park, or the night markets will take place. People say this will be a hot summer because winter was ‘pretty cold’. They expect days of above 40C. Last time that happened, the Melbourne wheel of fortune, a local shot at the London Eye, melted. You read right, the huge iron structure melted. So now it sits there, being slowly rebuilt, watching Melbourne watching it. That’s one attraction I’m not riding on.

Melbourne Wheel

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